Supportive Advocacy When It Matters Most

What could occur if my dental implant procedure goes wrong?

Before dental implant surgery, a dentist typically performs a thorough examination to determine your suitability for the procedure. Diagnostic tests could determine if you have healthy enough teeth and gums to handle implants. As noted by Healthline, preexisting medical conditions such as gum disease, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis could cause complications.

A dentist may ask you to first treat a condition so that it does not interfere with post-procedure healing. Failing to take recommended preliminary steps could cause the procedure to fail. Other medical issues could also develop.

Which circumstances could lead to serious medical issues?

Research published on the U.S. National Library of Medicine’s website notes that cardiovascular diseases could affect a patient’s blood flow. With restricted oxygenated blood flow, tissues may not heal properly after an implant procedure. According to the Mayo Clinic, individuals who smoke or who have sinus problems may also have less than successful implant outcomes.

As noted by WebMD, individuals with heart conditions may require antibiotics before undergoing a dental procedure. A release of bacteria into the bloodstream related to a dental procedure could lead to a worsened cardiovascular condition. A discussion or review of the relationship between a dental procedure and heart health could help avoid serious complications.

What may reflect a dentist’s negligence?

Researchers estimate 5% to 10% of dental implants fail each year. Neglecting to diagnose a preexisting condition prior to an implant procedure may reflect malpractice and require legal action. A dentist may, for example, have overlooked an issue related to a patient’s sinuses, which could cause a misplaced implant to protrude into a sinus cavity.

Dental practitioners owe a duty of care to examine patients thoroughly before performing a procedure. Without reviewing 3D images or X-rays, a dentist may miss discovering a potential problem that affects a patient’s recovery or future health.